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Webinar "Global Citizenship"

Date

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Time

10:00 AM Europe/London

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Presenter

Matthew Hayes

Matthew Hayes, BA (Oxon), MA (SOAS), is a doctoral researcher at the Institute of Education in London. His research concerns Global Citizenship Education in English language textbooks. Matthew is also the Director of Growth at Publons, the world’s largest peer review platform and a part of Clarivate Analytics. Matthew was previously Commercial Director at wizdom.ai, an AI-driven research startup acquired by Taylor & Francis. Prior to that he worked for Springer Nature for 10 years, latterly as Regional Director in their Education division.
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Agenda

Global Citizenship

Educators can play a unique role in enabling their students to participate on the global stage - whether in work or life. Global Citizenship Education (GCE) encourages students to think beyond their immediate community, towards the challenges and opportunities of their globally connected generation. In this webinar, Matthew will take you through the concept of GCE - where it comes from, what it is, why it matters, and how it can be practically implemented in the classroom. He will cover three broad themes in current GCE thinking and practice: global orientation, global skills and global action.

This talk will be of particular interest to teachers working in international contexts, or wishing to incorporate cross-curricular skills into their teaching of mainstream subjects.